Eggs & Cholesterol

MYTH:  The cholesterol in eggs can plug your arteries.

TRUTH:  Eggs are a near perfect food.  They provide the highest quality dietary protein and every mineral and vitamin (except vitamin C).  The cholesterol content of the egg yolk has little or nothing to do with the cholesterol circulating through your arteries, and even less to do with the plaque that can build up in those arteries.

Cholesterol is a vital bodily substance, so vital that the less cholesterol you eat, the more your body makes internally.  About 75% of the cholesterol in the human body is made by the body itself; only 25% or so comes from the diet.  If you are a total vegetarian (vegan), then 100% of the cholesterol in your body is made internally.  [See also “Cholesterol”, “Cholesterol, Elevated”, and “Atherosclerosis”.]

Many years ago, there was an experiment conducted in a U.S. prison.  Volunteers were fed 18 eggs per day (6 with each of three meals).  At the end of the experiment, the average blood cholesterol levels of the volunteers had gone down.  Probably because when you are that full of eggs, you don’t have any room for junk food.  Serum cholesterol levels tend to increase in those who consume large amounts of sugar.

Patients suffering from massive burns are often fed concentrated eggs, because this excellent source of protein enables the body to generate new skin tissue faster than by any other means.  Some of these patients are fed the equivalent of 60 eggs per day, with no significant changes to their serum cholesterol levels.

The body can process only so much cholesterol from food at a time.  Once the liver has received all that it can use, it excretes the rest through the bile.

Also see the chapter, “The Cholesterol Myth”, in NUTRITIONAL SOLUTIONS FOR 88 CONDITIONS  (available at Amazon.com)

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